Globe Lust: “Coal-fired plants – what do they mean to us?”


Coal Mining in America, The way it's done...not good.

Globe Lust:

“Coal-fired plants – what do they mean to us?”

By Beverly Franco  –  Los Angeles Environmentalist / Activist

I often ask myself, if we are burning coal to provide electricity, where does the coal come from and at what cost? Not just the cost in dollars, but in social and natural capital.

Social capital is the human equation that we need to include and consider in every decision. Add natural capital – which is the impact of the decision and/or project on nature.  Both of these need and must be considered before focusing on the financial capital of any undertaking, no matter what it is or involves.

These two very important and vital capital investments should rule and guide all of our decisions, whether its here or in another country – around the world.   Each person’s humanity needs to be considered, as well as the natural world we all live in.  Can we afford the long-term costs in the human equation?

So, we are back to coal – that black stuff that I remember watching come down the coal shute into the basement which was part of our house in Madison, Wisconsin. My understanding of what it did was limited by this 8 year old’s simple and as yet, uneducated mind. I knew my aunt and uncle used it to heat this large two-story house we lived in. I don’t recall being cold, so guess it did the job. I wasn’t into questioning then. Now, I’m trying make up for lost time.

Now my understanding and my questioning has broadened and I want to know where the coal comes from for the carbon-producing coal-fired plants and what is the damage to acquire that coal?  The damage to the miners who have gone down into the mines for many years – it’s a living, but the end result for those miners was and is black-lung disease, which means a reduced quality of life and early death.

Now we have MTRMountain-top removal, where the coal companies, with deep pockets, blast off the tops of mountains. When you blow up something, what happens? There is debris, fallout that has to go somewhere.  Imagine turning on your kitchen faucet and seeing black water coming out, or attempting to take a shower and the same thing happening. You are now dirtier than you were when you  stepped into the shower!   Waterways, rivers, streams and the water are things we need to survive.  Yuk!  Now picture a “pond” filled with sludge – a by-product of separating coal from rock. This is what the residents of West Virginia. Kentucky, and Tennessee live with.

I’m well aware that there are always hazards around us, but some could be prevented.  Like the coal industry, in its wake, does shovel its waste into open pits, leaves abandoned mines, and huge slurry ponds like the one that burst its banks, December 2008 in Kingston, Tennessee, sending a billion gallons of toxic goo into and across the Emory River, covering 300 acres six feet deep. And there are more sites that threaten the land, water, and lives of the citizens in these areas.

In West Virginia, where this latest MTR is underway by Massey Coal. The last mountain standing is Coal River Mountain in the Coal River Valley. Residents are fighting to stop this and have formed Coal River Mountain Project to explore wind energy instead of blasting the mountain to kingdom come or to hell, whichever way you want to call it.  Massey has already received the necessary permits to blast away.

The residents of this valley are also very, very concerned, not only about their water supply, which is still fresh and drinkable, for now. But less than 100 yards from the site where earth-shattering explosives are being detonated by Massey Coal, lies the Brushy Fork Impoundment – the largest lake of coal sludge in the Western Hemisphere. The instability of such impoundments is a disaster waiting to happen.

Its important to point out that, more than likely, the coal will be gone in 20 years, but what will be left if its all been blown up and the waste hasn’t gone anywhere?  The lack of vision for a viable future is subverted by money, and its called greed.

Personally, I find it harder and harder to sleep in my cozy, electrified and comfortable home, while others are not so comfortable or safe.  Its called Bearing Witness, a Quaker axiom – once you know, you can still chose to turn away but not from ignorance.  We know now and we can chose to act, to make change, to demand change. Its in our power and it’s the right thing to do.

In Arizona, Hopi and Navajo Native Americans are trudging toward a future that might include electricity. Electricity that is generated by solar and wind.   Electricity that, until recently, didn’t exist on the reservation where they lived, even though many worked for Peabody Coal-fired plant! For 30+ years Peabody has used the Black Rock aquifer to transport the coal, called slurry to a station that supplied the electricity for southern Arizona, Nevada and California.  Did you note that the  Native Americans did not have electricity, all the while 50% of the residents were working at this coal-fired plant? Now that aquifer is history and the company, Peabody, has closed down the plant instead of going to the expense of installing scrubbers to capture the polluting carbon being emitted by the plant. Imagine, if you will, what 30+ years of emitting that has done to our atmosphere, to our lungs?

Ignorance on the part of many, myself included, helps to continue this voracious and insidious habit of supporting our comfort zones, while at the terminus of the process, many go without.  Children doing their homework by daylight, quickly, or using kerosene lamps or candlelight.   Where is the outrage?

My children didn’t suffer that. Just flip a switch, turn on the faucet.

Get your pencils out to write down the name of the organization that the Hopi and Navajo have formed to bring in their own electricity, their own employment by way of wind and solar farms utilizing the monies from cap-and-trade? Sandia Tribal Energy Program.

Hopis and Navajos will generate their OWN power!

Edison has fought this, as they believe the rate-payers should get this money. If the savings from cap-and-trade can be passed on to our first citizens to be self-sustaining and self-supporting, it’s the right thing to do. And, maybe, its about time that was the agenda, for us all.

Lights, fresh water, jobs. Add in dignity and respect, and we all have hope.– Beverly Franco, Writer and Green Activist

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Sounds West: Paul Plagens, Patria Jacobs, Greg Franco and more…


PlagensThe best music in Los Angeles right now…

There’s an electric feeling that shivers right up your spine when a singer nails your head and heart at the same time. Whether that song radiates from the artist’s illium, Sacrum or the “I’ve been to the depths of my personal hell, and I’m back to tell you about it!”   You just know when it’s the real deal.   When someone unearths an uncanny knack for finding your bruises and putting a thumb to them, it makes you take notice. Such is the case with John Doe and Exene of “X”, John Prine,  and Alex Chilton, in my humble estimation anyway.  These folks might hail from different times and places within the rock music continuum,  but in my book,they all aged artistically, and experienced new stages of life.  They are still-expanding musical nebulae.  For John Doe,  Moving deep into the California mountains, gave him the ability  to focus on his land, his community and on the tools of songwriting.  The result was the birth of  his  album, “A Year In The Wilderness.”  Far from he and Exene’s 1987 release “See How We are,”  Doe became less plaintive on depicting the visuals for his songs and instead embedded them adeptly into the sounds and song structures that seem to identify ‘The New Americana”  Doe still uses his  lyrics to “tell” the listener what to “see”but  his writing became more complex and compelling for sure.
Not since John Prine have I seen songwriting this affecting and visual. In John Prine we saw a man in “some deep kind of  funk”,  longing or loving,  whether it was for a woman or his own child, Prine’s songs,sometimes sweet, alot of times funny, share two common links with the writers I mentioned earlier,  irony and brazen honesty.  Mr. Prine kept it country and nailed our funny bone just when we needed it most.

Giving me shivers up my spine as a college kid, not only for his looks, but for the mere sound of his voice,  Alex Chilton’s incandescent, “Big Star”  paired deep suffering growls, poppy eclectic grooves with desirous falsettos. Chilton made me melt and best of all I could see a  creative process at work.    It’s that “well thought out” lyrical muscle that was flexed by some and now seems frighteningly flabby in most writers nowadays.  What about that  lyrical twist? Where are the words that make you think?

I decided to wrestle my dial from NPR just for a brief moment this morning as I was feeling a bit  “song-sick.”  I needed  an anthem for the day.  I often seek out something specifically intended to swirl around in my head for the rest of  the day.  All I found was a “sea of nauseatiatingly common method songwriting” or songs wantonly layered with a multitude of trance tracks with  “Akon-like vocal overlays” that simply use alliteration in efforts to qualify as “the new hybrid rap.”

Even though mainstream top 40 charts seem to have lately produced  a world of “word-weary copy-cats”, the musical landscape does reveal shimmers of placer.  At the urging of a friend  I gave a listen to the very English “Duffy” and immediately downloaded her entire album. Her voice was at once very “antique” yet freshly familiar. “A Fine Frenzy” (one Allison Sudol , apparently enamoured with the imagery of Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”),  offers a finely tuned sweet and athletic voice.   Her deft lyrics are organic, lively and refreshing and surprising in structure.  Sudol’s Fine Frenzy is guilty of keeping one or two songs in my head for several days now.   If you ever followed Amy Farris  (how we’ll miss that lady…), whether it’s was Dave Alvin’s Guilty Women or a Brian Wilson record, you would again,found that soulful straightforward style, this time with a Viola or a violin.

While bright spots like Duffy, A Fine Frenzy and others are capturing the hearts and minds of listeners nationwide,  “The singer-songwriter genre,” is alive and tangible in our clubs. A trip into Los Angeles reveals the likes of some of the current autuers:  Paul Plagens, Patria Jacobs, Greg Franco of Rough Church and his “big in New Zealand” solo project:  “Greg Franco’s Wandering Bear.” Also sharing a multi-directional inspired genius is Suki Ewers who brings her swirling  personally lyrical songs that take off where Mazzy Star left off.

The great American art of  songwriting didn’t end with Robert Zimmerman, Arlo or Woody, it’s alive and well and it’s here for the listening.

1. Paul Plagens

The”perfect mix” of all the aspects that make a songsmith shine.  Not unlike a contemporary John Prine, Plagens just cannot be missed. I was invited to 2nd St. Jazz for my birthday back in June of this year,  where Patria Jacobs Tex-Pate and former leader of “RubyFish”  consistently hammers  out one after another “Patriaworld”  experiences.  The lean and cool  Plagens played songs such as:  Lovesick Car and others.  That night Paul stood out with his soulful songs and uncommon humor. He’s been a member of the rock / alt band “Greta”, and done tons of studio work for ‘more than famous folks.  In addition to his own projects Plagens “sings honest” affecting well-crafted alliterative stories of real life interspersed  with unexpected hilarity.   He’s a treat to see and experience and in my opinion seems to inhabit that fruitful web of  artists in the vein of Prine, Doe, and Chilton.  Not yet  having garnered the movement that the luxury of time provides, I believe he’s poised to be “that next great singer-songwriter.  Obviously you should not miss Paul Plagens!

2. Patria Jacobs

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“Tex-pate” (L.A. transplant or many years now) and Chanteuse of American indie pop,  Patria’s swooning visceral songs define anyone’s emotional landscape.  Her deft and oceanic songs are not to be missed.  On her new release “Poison of the Sea” Patria’s smoky growl will have you enraptured. From her time as the co-conspirator behind “RubyFish” with Russ Chaput, to the eclectic forary into the pop/electronic visage that is her single “Do the Pink,”  Patria is a purveyor of fine music of Los Angeles often found hammering out another “Patriaworld” where she spotlights great singer-songwriters and multi-member local bands. Always a great host and performer  herself, she is expanding and changing the L.A. music scene.

3. Greg Franco

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The L.A. Weekly called Greg Franco “An Iconic Auteur,” who began his stay on the Los Angeles scene in the very early eighties with the seminal low brow band, The Blashpemous Yellow.   B.Y., sported some type of pounding and often times sweet bleating “grunky” (Grungy-Punk) type of thing… picture the musical love-child resulting from some  operatic tryst between “The Minute and Men” and “Gang of Four” then you might have an idea of the sound.  Crooning about the barrios of Chavez Ravine, and  the dusty in-betweens of San Fernando road, Franco et. al., haunted all the venues that would have them.  Venues such as  The Anti-Club, the Lhasa, The Music Machine, Madame Wong’s, Al’s Bar and many others.   Later the front-man for “Ferdinand”, a  four piece including Laura Smith and David Guerrero of  Third Grade Teacher, shook Silverlake and other venues up and down the coast with crunch alternative rock and roll that you had to eat with a fork.   Franco’s current troupe, Rough Church, is a “states-living but New Zealand famous” quartet. As if Rough Church wasn’t enough, Franco must believe he’s got  more hands than the Hindu god Vishnu herself, as he’s also working on his flagship personal project, “Greg Franco’s wandering bear.”  You can’t keep a good man down.

I can’t wait for these interviews, and videos, which are coming soon.  However, pictures are below.  But come back soon and we’ll finish the gig.

Below are: Patria Jacobs, Paul Plagens and Greg Franco.


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Some celebrities are blessed to have their “looks” (whether natural or manufactured,or a combination of both) for a long time. Some are not. Some hold on to hairstyles that are frighteningly obvious nods to their past glory.  Take Nick Nolte’s blonde slightly wavy early 90’s tresses, that he  had to cooley brush away as he crouched against the fender of a car whilst he slowly grabbing for his gun to take sniperly aim at some nefarious character.  Those tresses are still being rocked!  And now…they’re only food for papparazi. The vermin that creeps along our city streets stalking celebrities just minding their own business (ruthless and innane hairstlyes or not), seems to parallel the massive increase in Celebrity Worship Syndrome.   A man not helping the situation is one Donald Trump!  Maybe his inspiration for the super-wide girth of the comb-over that he mashes down every AM with some type of sheening potion, was the inspired result of his attendance at a “Player” concert back in 1977? (Remember Player’s “Baby Come Back?)….On the original album cover, Check the guy to extreme the left of the lead singer-the bassist Ron Moss.  The Donald must’ve fancied himself as au’ courant as brother Moss. Obviously vulnerable  to the smallest chinook, these folks have got to know how un-daily life-friendly their coiffes actually are, but still they can’t wrangle themselves from the visual ties to their past. Whether it’s the oft heard, “Hey!  it’s trendy again! mantra,…IT’S JUST FOOD FOR THE PAPARAZZI!!   Public complaints from these  waning nebulai about those predatory plebians falls at least on my deaf ears, as these grumps wait with baded breath to get the holy grail of bad hair shots. For example one Mr. Trump, saunters across Las Vegas Boulebard one breezy afternoon (possibly 12 bodyguards in tow),  a soft chinook sweeps across the stinky cigarette and piss soaked Las Vegas Boulevard and  circles up the belly of The Donald, where it devilishly lifts up Mr. Trump’s rug! OOPS!  SNAP!!!  CLICK!!! Literally taking flight (un-Falcon-Heene-like), the “combie” seems to actually wave back at the photog!  Not unlike catching a senegalese tiger in the depths of India in some natural act ‘never before captured on camera,’ the photog is eccstatic! What a snap, what a day!  ‘I don’t have to work for three months!’  I can drive my daughter to Kindercare in the mornings! My wife can dance later at Spearamint Rhino tonight!

..The Donald’s “faux-woven” (new word alert: “Fauxven”) was merely  hanging on by a few fine strands.  More appropriate for a sail than a toupee, Mr. Trump will have gained lift by the time the wind dies down.  Calling for his “boy” to come and re-coiffe his appendage.  The Donald  quickly re-gains swagger and returns on this path to the limo.   Donald, Mr. Nolte, Ms. Lohan and others REALLY ARE good for the economy.  Lessening depression as they wallow in their own, giving people a laugh and helping papparazi and the entire supply chain that goes with those magazines keep their children in Lucky Brand Jeans.  It’s a rough job, but someone’s gotta do it.Picture 23
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