The Trouble With Milk: 2010 in review – How loud were we?


The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Fresher than ever.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 3,000 times in 2010. That’s about 7 full 747s.

 

In 2010, there were 53 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 81 posts. There were 257 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 84mb. That’s about 5 pictures per week.

The busiest day of the year was December 9th with 66 views. The most popular post that day was “SOUNDS-WEST” The best music in Los Angeles .

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were stumbleupon.com, facebook.com, webmail.aol.com, en.wordpress.com, and WordPress Dashboard.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for the trouble with milk, birth defects pictures, disney female characters, deadmau5, and disney male characters.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

“SOUNDS-WEST” The best music in Los Angeles October 2009
3 comments

2

NCLB and it’s effects on school ‘truancy.’ or…Pearls of Wisdom: “If our American life fails the child, it fails us all.” ~ Pearl S. Buck writer and sometime sha-woman.. March 2010
7 comments

3

Kettleman City – We need another Cesar Chavez. February 2010

4

Micachu and the Shapes: Bite your lip, get up and Dance. January 2010

5

How the Amelia Bedelia Books SHOULD be titled! October 2009

Some kind of Soul Mining: The music of Tim Easton


Take any John Prine song, A myriad of guitar riffs rooted in blues and folk, some early Dylan, and some plum picking for good measure  and  you  get Ohio-born, Joshua-Tree-living Tim Easton. ”

Easton, driven westward both geographically and musically since his college days in Akron Ohio, finally settled one hundred and forty  miles east of  Los Angeles in the sweet little outpost known as Joshua Tree.  A place where the work of contemporary artists can be found among cactus and creosote, where eclectic and soulful music  is made among the  Ocotillo and the yucca.  Though his  home base is admittedly Joshua Tree honky tonk watering hole Pappy and Harriets, Tim’s toured extensively in support of his four albums to date, landing in Europe and Asia in addition to a myriad of cities in the United States.  A 2006 tour opening for Lucinda Williams landed him at the Pabst theate in Milwaukee, the Ginger Rogers Theater in Medford Oregon, and the Paramount Theater in Austin Texas expousing revealing his soulful influences of Muddy Waters, Woody Guthrie.

Easton’s Folk Americana vacillates between the low down bluesey  growl of “Burgundy Red” from his 2009 release “Porcupine” to the  gospel meme hootenanny of “carry me” featured on 2001’s “The Truth about us” “Get What I got” also off Porcupine, offers a post punk downtempo vibe, with a slight nod to CCR  hiding quietly in plain view.  “Porcupine” combines Easton’s exploratory past while welcoming an edginess,that compounds all the elements digested by Easton over the years.

As if making  cathartic blues Americana wasn’t enough, Tim creates inspired folk art paintings that are currently centered on the motif of ‘the guitar.’  Certainly the god’s cannot be so indulgent! as to afford an already great musician an outstanding talent in a second craft,  But oh yes the god’s gluttony exposes them.  Easton’s paintings turn out not to be sophomoric indulgences by any means, in other words, they are not musings stretching weakly into another creative genre. They are  inspired and informed.  True pieces of mature art.  If you ventured out to SXSW in 2009  Tim’s visual representations were on display at the YARD DOG  gallery, as will several pieces from the 500 Individually painted vinyl jackets supporting”Porcupine.”  The vinyl jackets for this album were  paintings combining wood stain and designs of guitars and porcupines.  Tim’s other folk art uses found wood, oils and acrylics, chalk and pastels, and mostly features the guitar as it’s main subject.    If Musician, visual artist, aren’t enough to fill one’s creative palate, the “creatively-voracious” Easton also writes and is the founder and publisher of a community newsletter and ‘zine called The Joshua Tree Republic.”

A Video snippet of Tim Live in Bucyrus, Ohio exposes Easton telling the crowd that ‘the song he’s going to play next is called, ‘Carry Me’ at which time  very drunk woman whom has apparently been very disruptive during the show with a raspy voice finally yells, “SLAYER!!!, SLAYER!!!”  Tim isn’t caught vulnerable, instead he capitalizes on the situation with a deadpan and swift response by saying, ‘the day I play a Slayer song, is the day you get married.”   Easton comically takes interruptions, hecklers in stride.  and with humor, marches on, no bother and begins picking.

This is Real Folk music, an undeniable a romp  through the desert. It’s music about relationships – both coveted and lost.  The beauty and the tragic things too.  This is Americana,  This is the real Hootenanny, this is some kind of rave up, this is Tim Easton.

Find Tim Easton at: http://timeaston.com

~Chrissylong

Micachu and the Shapes: Bite your lip, get up and Dance.



The Precocious, multi-instrumentality of Micachu and the Shapes is like camping on an English moor full of howling wolves as you dance to a Kraftwerk album with Gavin Friday, Marke E. Smith and Guggi.  You’ll need a tour-guide in for this moor party because it’s a bafflingly intricate, yet uneasy place. Walking at night, you feel your feet sink into the moor, tin pans crash, an acoustic guitar rants and a shock of Roux-like hair bounces in and out of the frame. Just aloft you spy Colin Newman stoking a sonic campfire as he types on his iphone.  The fire crackles repetitively with a  waffle and snap.  You are at a zeitgeist sleepover, a tempiscore melding of sense datum.   Yes, you are overloaded but in a playful dreamlike state, these things are expected!   In fact it feels downright amazing, the music in the background has a restless energy,   a crack, a pop.   Set against a nefarious groan or the heaving low hum of soft machines, this eclectic pop is tamed by a warm and yet  distinctive androgynous voice.    That is the sound of Micachu and the Shapes, and it’s not a dream.  Micachu (Mica Levi) is tangible! and in a club somewhere tonight playing a vacuum cleaner.

Mica sits staccato, with an unexpected and painterly face. Her voice and  demeanor  project an element of confident-uneasiness. a careless androgyne, tall with a complex grin,  she is an ‘artiste de artist,’  one  bringing sounds useful to Dee jays, club-goers and the lucky and hard working denizens of Rough Trade, San Francisco.  So far everyone fron Bjork to Beck are calling her one of their “influences.”  or at at least “the most un-classifiable pop experimental music existing today.”   That’s pretty good when the avant-garde of the uber popular alternative are calling you “one of the lovely bones with which we are collectively building this thing we call popular music”.

Straddling many genres of music at one time, Michachu has got the concept cornered. How does someone play front instruments, sing,  and add the sound of a vacuum cleaner along with pops and clacks purposfully (and perfectly) set in time to a thick bumping background track? In my humble opinion the only contemporary rock band able to cross this boundary and do well with so many genres was  The White Stripes.  Jack White did whatever he wanted, and Meg was the co-ideator / conspirator in those avant experiments that turned into great songs.   The only constant was his voice as the music always surprised, swelled and dipped as he wailed and groaned in new and different ways.   Experimental, though, it was not.    It was exploratory. In Micachu and the Shapes’  type of ‘experimental’,   there’s  an element of  “I don’t care, I do what I want, what feels right at the time, and by the way… to hell with this ‘image thing”.   It seems  Levi and company do not ascribe to any specific assemblage of their art, it simply is… “what it is.”

Micachu and The Shapes’ songs arent’ about punching other girls in bars, thanks Lilly, we’ve had enough of that.  It was fun in the begining, but now we have to see other people.   The female role in new music must get some plaster and lathe ready and quick, because Micachu just ripped that house a hole in the wall.

As Micachu swoons into a neutral plastic bounce, “Golden Phone,”  seems to reference her ‘style,’ that is, if she could be categorized…

How could they even care it’s a nonsense sound
This sound is everywhere but it can’t be found
Find Nancy fool around and the noise went white
It built the warmth back and there was light

Crimes everywhere yeah, but I don’t want that
Love’s all around yeah, but I don’t want that
Gold in my hair yeah, but I don’t want that
Bring me that nonsense sound and I’ll be back

Well, crushed up bit of stuff, can you pull their ear?
Their legs are far too stiff and they can’t get near
I’ll make this call back to you in a year
Mongrels, this nonsense sound won’t disappear

The song ‘Lips’ explores grime and punk crossover sounds.  Not unlike the likes of early Gang of Four, or Wire, Mica and the Shapes sharp and staccato dithering make you wanna get up and dance.

Die, die, die, your lips  a big lie

You lie all the time, but you still get by.

You bite your tongue but you don’t comply

Dry your tears away with your tie

You drive that truck but you’re still let by

Drop, drop, drop, your lips a big lie

In ‘Sweetheart’ and ‘Eat your Teeth’ Mica samples and manipulates every squeal and stray breath.  She and The Shapes, processes them into pop staccato explosions.  In contrast,  ‘Golden Phone’ is a dirty punk song, breathless and beguiling.

This is the Golden phone, can you ring me back?

Ten mongrels home alone bring the panic back

Sound traveled in the air then they blew it back

The took out all the noise and it all went black

How could they even care it’s a nonsense sound

This sound is everywhere but it can’t be found

Find Nancy fool around and the noise went white

It built the warmth back and there was light

‘Worst Bastard’ is pure punk brilliance; whilst “Vultures” may have the same basic background as Glen Branca’s, “The Ascension” Lesson No. 1″  I could be wrong though.  Branca’s wall of sound is exactly  the intricacy Micachu uses in their swirling and full soundscapes, and especially on this song.   The new Shapes’ album “Jewellery” is on track for album British Album of the year and I’m not surprised.  It may have to fight with La Roux’s signature album “La Roux” but they really are different territory.

In “Curly teeth”, Micachu uses a squeaky sound as a background layer and a dissonence that actually works under her defined and short shap vocals. “Curly teeth” does not dissapoint in fact as with other Shapes’ songs, it surprises once again.

I stumbled upon Micachu and the Shapes about 3 months ago via my favorite performance artiste chanteuse Bjork, and in my humble opinion, this unclassfiable band headed up by Mica Levi  is  channeling the best of electronica, rough wire, punk, avant-garde, pop, and dance. This stateside inhabitant will be sure to see them when they turn up at any venue within 40 miles of me.  Even if you just go to see someone use a vacuum cleaner onstage, don’t miss them when they come to town.

La ROUX!! Listen up statesiders… change is in the hair.


Elly Jackson of La Roux

Don’t call her “Techno Lady Gaga”  or  “young  Annie Lennox” unless you would like a sneer and a few explatives, but Elly Jackson feels the critics encircling…literally chanting… with ever increasing volume:  “Elly Jackson is The new face of Electronic Music!”   Go see her  in the clubs before Madonna, Jay-Z or some such music mogul accosts her and makes her choose whether or not to sell her soul to the devil.    Jackson, along with bandmate and co-writer, co-producer Ben Langmaid,  meld together wild pulses,  fluttery beats and popping thick synth drums.   Capturing sound like  bolts of sassy lightening stuffed into a tesla coil, Elly croons …’We can fight our desires
Ohhhh but when we start making fires… We get ever so hot… Ohhhhh whether we like it or not….
They say we can love who we trust… Ohhhh but what is love without lust?

The red-haired one”

In late 1995, Happening upon a baby naming book, Elly figured “La Roux” was as good a name as any as it fit the shocking scarlet hue of her hair.  Consequently  the masculine form of “Roux” was prescient as she realized “Rousee” could’ve been seen as conversationally opposite of her persona as it did not fit her obvious androgyny.  Later hybridizing her amazing coiffe  into a Bowie-esque/ Mike Score do, La Roux / Elly Jackson the stage persona was born.     Beginning her musical journey on seventies Nick Drake and Carole King amongst other gritty songsters, early in life Elly developed the  love of a well crafted song.

A shock of Stardust colored hair, on-stage intensity, and andro-lustful poses to match,  Jackson  conjures  the soulful thick electronic sound of Depeche Mode, The poppy playfulness of Yazoo, and the stylistic croon of Allison Moyet.    La Roux has managed a completely new sound from the ashes of the best in eighties electronica.  Ahem….’New Wave’ as some of us remember.

“Quicksand”

With their Freshman effort  released by Parisian label Kitsuné, in 2008, La Roux later tapped  producer “Lifelike” for the remix of  “In For The Kill !” which  debuted at number 11 in the UK Singles Chart.  Finally signed to Polydor Records, La Roux released their debut album, uncerimoniously called “La Roux.”


The same effort yielded “Buletproof” which was released as a single in June of ’09.  It debuted at # 1 in the UK Singles Chart.. In the U.S. it topped the Dance/Club Play chart the week of September 17. I’m Not Your Toy was released to the baded breath of house / techno devotees on September 29th of this year.

Joining Lily Allen’s UK tour in March of ‘o9, La Roux began a long touring commitment that included the NME Radar Tour, The Glastonbury, Oxegen, Reading and Leeds outings.  Finally placating almost rabid dance fans in the U.S., La Roux toured North America in July and August of 2009.   Canadian venues were supported as was The Jimmy Kimmel show in addition to the historic Troubadour in Hollywood / West L.A. Lucky San Franciscans attended “Popscene”  (The Club NME series),  and enjoyed an amazing show even if a playful yet  snarky Jackson taunted “Which one of you is gonna have this up on YouTube tomorrow?

Planning to pen their sophmore effort sometime after  their very busy tour is done, but with no specific date in mind, La Roux isn’t gonna push.  You can’t rush art.  Their  beats are born of collaboration,  they aren’t aimless, or repetitive,  and are not without rhyme or reason.  They’ve got originality, substance and direction.  That’s what makes them so palatable to a very musically-hungry-stateside-beast.

We’re still digesting La Roux, discovering it’s nuances, and incredibly buoyant at this very British “discovery”. In closing, whatever is rolled up into the collective conscience of La Roux does not really matter, for quite simplistically, all any music lover needs to know is that  La Roux bounces like the devil and how lucky we are to be in the room.

We can fight our desires
Ouuhh but when we start making fires
We get ever so hot
Ouuhh whether we like it or not.
They say we can love who we trust
Ouuhh but what is love without lust?
Two hearts with accurate devotions
Ouuhh and what are feelings without emotions?

~Chrissylong

The Willowz ~


The Willowz

When Anaheim was bad she was very very  bad. (Think “The Block at Disney” and The Mighty Ducks)  and… when Anaheim was good she was very very good… think “No Doubt” , good Udon, cheap mexican food (The “B” on the window as you enter means: “BEST.)”   The Cold War Kids, The Mighty Ducks in ’03 and ’07… and THE WILLOZ!!   Anaheim, a sometimes Fickle and brazenly pompous beauty, has redeemed herself by allowing the germination of this  willowy band of musical choristers.

The Willowz were once called “Just out of high school long-hairs” with a  “Billy Corrigan on helium” for a lead singer.  Now everyone’s eating their words.

Punk, soul, blues, an electric hybrid.  Isn’t that what making music is all about?  Bit o’ pixies, bit o’ sonic love, go ahead pull up a chair and listen.  Have a pen and paper nearby, you’ll have to make a list of the influences that you can hear and yet listen hard and close because they are so well blended, twisted, molded, melded and lit up with a blow torch that you’ll have trouble really naming them.  Again.  That’s the way it should be.  At once familiar and yet not, what goes into the willowz is original and made in the perfection of it’s own collective raw personality.  A sonic, yet organic, tree like sound.  Yes the Willowz are like trees.  Branches wild and strong and able to span in any direction.  2007 ‘s release “Chataqua” proved that they band could comb new limbs and encourage growth in new directions.  Witness “Evil Son”  …met a man with an evil stare said I’m the wicked one and quite aware, I lost my nerve, I said don’t despiar…My evil son time to prepare.” The song traverses melodic soulsey balladry and progresses to a Wolfmother  free-for-all in a matter a few stanzas.  Complete with a gong and a slide of the entire neck of a gretsch or the like and some bells, These Willowz aren’t afraid to make a rattle in the garden.  The rattle in this song isn’t entirely the stuff of seasoned auteurs, but the seeds are sewn.

From the bedroom and into the bedlam, Willoz made the trek in 2002 with Richie James Follin and Jessica Reynoza leading and grew their sound.  Perfecting the best and losing the rest, this band is an organic petrie dish project that has been obviously carefully nurtured.

“Willowz” came to Jessica in a dream  when a tree told her that the word “Willow”  would being her musical enlightenment. I’ve had dreams where a word was prominent but they told me things like, “Ride your horse to the front of Vons and then fold it into the baloney package, take the stairs in the pagoda go to the top and  attend school given by headmaster Angela Merkel sporting a small whip made from whale bone.  But I digress.

Good news can travel fast even if all your friends don’t listen to NPR.  Later in blustery ’02 The Willowz  released a 7” on the infamous Posh Boy records with  Robbie Fields producing.  Traipsing back to the arms of that  “mean girl Anaheim”  that somber fair weathered friend who pushed them around at the lockers and ignored them in the hallways, The Willowz then began playing kick-ass shows to ever growing crowds.  Simultaneously moving and in and around Los Angeles, in 2004, Dionysus records soon released their first record “The Willowz.  In a pungent and yet sweet turn of events the OC Weekly named “The Willowz’s” record as one of the top 10 albums of the year!    v

They had snagged Paul Kostabi as their producer and the record was done in a few days.  There’s nothing like raw unknowingness to lend a disjointed and yet energetic spell of desire to the sound of a record.  The Jackson Pollack method of laying music like paint worked well.  Wild abandon tempered with some direction to the splatter of the sound.  Okay some say J.P. planned every stray swath of paint but he applied but  I do not agree.  There’s joy, surprise and improvisation even in the most wild, fractured and wonderful art.

The Willowz

Soon after touring greater North America, and Europe the Willowz music was featured in the cinematic and odd “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.”  Soon nominated for a grammy, Willowz were surprised when the Eternal Sunshine filmmaker Gondry had a dream about the Willowz song “I Wonder” and flew them out to NYC to make a video for them. Soon touring with the likes of the Weirdos, NY Dolls, the Dirtbombs, the Greenhornes, Wolfmother, the Ponys, Tom Vek, Ted Leo, YGM, OK GO, the Gossip, Brian Jonestown Massacre, the Dwarves, Burning Brides, John Cale and many others, The Willowz had come full circle and seemed to be the musical version of someone’s  Tibetan dream set in Yarlung South Central Tibet was coming true. But noone was selected as the Rimpoche just yet.

In February 2005 the Willowz re-released their self titled album on Sympathy For the Record Industry and titled the album “Are Coming” (with a four more songs on it). The follow up “Talk in Circles” was released June 2005 (also recorded in a garage by Paul Kostabi, this time as a four piece and with a little more focus on making an album) on the Long Beach, CA label Sympathy for the Record Industry by way of record mogul Long Gone John. “Talk in Circles” received extraordinary reviews, including “46th Best Album of the Year” by Rolling Stone and was also featured in another one of Gondry’s films, “The Science of Sleep”.

The Willowz were nominated by LA Weekly as one of the tope bands of 2005. More singles followed “Talk in Circles” on such labels as Contaminated, Acid Bird, and Sympathy. The second album was followed by a DVD, “See In Squares”, released on Sympathy. “See In Squares” contained 27 unique videos, all by different directors, and additional live concert footage at a catholic school summer camp in Oklahoma, several of these videos have gone on to win national and international awards.

For the third album “Chautauqua”, to be released on Steve Aoki’s Los Angeles label Dim Mak, the Willowz headed to the eastern countryside and set up a studio, this time in a basement, with Paul Kostabi producing again. They recruited Aric Bohn on guitar and Tony Mann back on the drums. “Chautauqua” provides the energy and rawness of the first albums with a thicker rock sound more focused on songwriting. They came out in ’09  and are in heavy rotation in a round L.A. with Steve Aoki lending support.  Do not miss the chimerous impression that is “The Willowz.”

~  Chrissylong

http://lala.com/zQ2n

Tracks:

Note:  The new music section will be written by Garet Whipple and has yet to be cleverly named!  But keep a watch for Garet’s new column!  Music spans from new pop to dance, trance and rock.  Garet knows the scene and writes with reverie.  Stay tuned.

The coolest band to photograph in the studio….ROUGH CHURCH


Greg Franco’s Rough Church invited me to photograph them in the studio and let me tell you these are some cool people. There was alot of laughter, raunchy jokes, talking about politics, green action, current events, good food seite mares sopa anything and everything.  They recorded at Andrew’s studio “Grandma’s Kitchen” in Silverlake. My D2H was sick and stuck at Nikon who promised it by the 7th and their update on it was nary to be found. (thanks guys)  So instead of having a tantrum, (which would have given me some bad personal mojo)  Calumet saved me by renting me a D90.  Photographing Rough Church was a breeze.  They didn’t mind me being ‘in their face’ so to speak.  Which I had to be, actually.  How else was I going to get the kind of photos that I like?  I like sharp angles, color, movement and design. Okay, so they hung with that.  Most of all I was amazed at the process of recording. It’s such a play between the producer and the band. It’s  a creative negotiation interspersed with humor, joking and serious technical audio and studio knowledge.   There’s this ability to let go get “into” the song, (pushing it out of your instrument and your body in a way that works with the rest of the band) and is also what’s being aimed for with regard to the track. And then then there’s this uncanny the ability to turn on a dime, stop and assess the track, your part and take direction from the producer on how to change or fine tune things based on the band’s goal for the sound of the track and ultimately the record. There would be banter about one part or another and some onomonopeia used to indicate some part of a song that was hard to describe.     How did these guys know what minute part they had to go back to and re-do?  Amazing.  Not to mention their technical craft and expertise.   Greg is an AMAZING lyricist and singer, he’s on angst filled growl  and rhythm guitar. Ever-sunny Jef Hogan pounds out a steady Bassline,  and Jon Franco works the the kit (even with a sheet over it for a dampened and thicker tone).   “Five” “Five Track” or “Fiver” leads melodically or grindingly on guitar, piano and sometime percussion. Studio work is part an acquiescent note by note assessment of the vibe, tone, tempo and energy of a song.   There are also some extemporaneous bursts that definitely provide for new and occasionally unexpected ideation.  Usually ideation is done before the studio time, but sometimes those things just burst from time and space and then everyone has an “Oh shit, keep that!”   moment, and so it goes. I knew ahead of time that each person would be on their own channel being miked, playing their part, playing their heart out, whilst listening to the full mix in their headphones.  What I didn’t realize was how tired doing this for two whole days from 11AM to 9PM at night can make someone!  Especially the drummer!   We took breaks and hung out in the control room or the lounge,  ate Thai food and ventured to “The Tribal Cafe” for smoothies, sandwiches etc.   I also just happened to discover THE ABSOLOUTE BEST PLACE FOR COFFEE IN ALL OF LOS ANGELES…The Tribal Cafe! http://www.tribalcafe.com They grind, brew and concoct Eurasian, Ameriasian, South American, Latasian, and latin coffees.   Some of the coffees are autentico and others the cool ideation of the owner.  Everything is hand made with passion and care, with health and vibrancy in mind.  You can get all manner of health and energy shots in just about anything.  AMAZING. The Minty Brew is KILLER. Do not miss it! I REPEAT, DO NOT MISS IT!!

Gentlemen to the core, within Greg Franco’s Rough Church there are no prima-donnas or  ‘mike hogs.’  These guys are all well tenured artists, some from the Los Angeles area and some hailing form the North and Five from the East Coast, Woodstock to be exact.

I’m always interested in the ‘language of music’ (how it works) and there’s was no shortage of  “studio-speak” for me to learn.  It’s changed alot since I’ve been in a studio years ago. At times it’s like sort of an esoteric audio dialect between these keepers of beats /syncopation and the guy assessing the beats and making suggestions.  You need these guys in an arena where you’re tryin’ to get some technical shit done!  Obviously the culture of anything this demands that those that ‘live in it’ speak the language!  Anyway… Andrew the owner of  ‘Grandma’s Kitchen’ has all the best equipment, a great console and basically an AMAZING STUIDO with all the best acoustic accouterments to be found. For the last recording, Rough Church asked me join in with a host of singers for a sort of ‘end of the album’ mock bar anthem called, “Rub one out for me” (Not unlike The Beatles’ “why don’t we do it in the road”) and  I sheepishly agreed.   I  sang my little pink heart out with people that were actually trained.   My only hope was to meld into the wall of voices, (not unlike Ike and Tina Turner’s ‘wall of sound’ production for ‘I forget what song it was…)   and stay somewhat unrecognizable.  I’m not sure if they had to surgically remove my baleful voice or not , but here’s to hoping that it was pleasant and actually helped the recording.  Enjoy this  visual smattering of pics from the recording.  Be sure to buy the new Rough Church CD when it comes out.  Some of these pics will be on the as of  yet to unnamed CD.  If you Bookmark this site, “The Trouble With Milk” I’ll take care of ‘ya….and make sure you know when it’s released.

For an overview of R.C.’s sound see my post:  Sounds West:  The Best Music in Los Angeles. Scroll down to the paragraph on Greg Franco’s Rough Church.  It also talks about Greg’s solo project, The highly revered in Australia and New Zealand “Greg Franco’s Wandering Bear.”  ~ Cheers!  Christina Long

for more info on my photography, you can find a bit on this blog and you can also go to:

http://www.wix.com/chrissylong/Christina%20Long%20Photography%20final

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