Hot Air on Global Warming


Hot Air on Global Warming.

John Coleman, the weatherman at KUSI in San Diego, has by his own rough estimate performed more than a quarter million weathercasts. It is not a stretch to say that he is largely responsible for the shape of the modern weather report. As the first weatherman on ABC’s Good Morning America in the late ’70s and early ’80s, Coleman pioneered the use of the onscreen satellite technology and computer graphics that are now standard nearly everywhere. In 1982 Coleman used his spare time—and media mogul Frank Batten’s money—to launch the Weather Channel. The idea seemed quixotic then, and his tenure as president ended a year later after an acrimonious split with Batten. But time proved Coleman to be something of a genius—by the time NBC Universal bought it in 2008, it had 85 million viewers and a $3.5 billion price tag.

RELATED CONTENT

Those were the first two acts of Coleman’s career. On a Sunday night in early November 2007, he sat down at his home computer and started to write the 967 words that would launch the third. “It is the greatest scam in history,” he began. “I am amazed, appalled, and highly offended by it. Global Warming: It is a SCAM.”

What had set him off was a football game. The Eagles were playing the Cowboys on Sunday Night Football, and as a gesture of environmental awareness—it was “Green Is Universal” week at NBC Universal—the studio lights were cut for portions of the pregame and halftime shows. Coleman, who had been growing increasingly skeptical about global warming for more than a decade, finally snapped. “I couldn’t take it anymore,” he told me. “I did a Howard Beale.”

Skepticism is, of course, the core value of scientific inquiry. But the essay that Coleman wrote, which was published on the website ICECAP, would have more properly been termed rejectionism. Coleman wasn’t arguing against the integrity of a particular conclusion based on careful original research. Instead, he went after the motives of the scientists. Climate researchers, he wrote, “look askance at the rest of us, certain of their superiority. They respect government and disrespect business, particularly big business. They are environmentalists above all else.”

The Drudge Report picked up Coleman’s essay, and within days its author was a cause célèbre on right-wing talk radio and cable television, beaming into Glenn Beck’s CNN show via satellite to elaborate on the scientists’ conspiracy. “They all have an agenda,” Coleman told Beck, “an environmental and political agenda that says, ‘Let’s pile on here, we’re all going to make a lot of money, we’re going to get research grants, we’re going to get awards, we’re going to become famous.’ ”

Soon Coleman was on the conference circuit, a newly minted member of the loose-knit confederation of professional skeptics. His interviews and speeches that have been posted to YouTube have, in some cases, been viewed hundreds of thousands of times.

Click the link above  (Hot air on global warming)  to read the next pages…
Advertisements

Ditch the Dead Heads!!!


No, We’re definitely not talking about your favorite Jerry Bear / Bob Weir lovin’ friends,

Jer-Bear and Bob

but the un-moving, previously living creatures above your head in your favorite restaurant or bar..

I’ve always thought those folks that hang the heads of moose, elk and the like were a bit looney tunes (still do), but mostly I hate going into restaurants and eating under the glassy eyed stare of some poor Elk that was probably just minding his own business checking out some milk thistle or looking for the perfect cow to hang out with. You know pass the boring time in the woods, that dang outback up there in Maine or in Canada or some place, vast, and cold.  Somewhere where things are peaceful.  It’s rough waiting until the permafrost melts.   The only ruckus is when Dick Cheney and his cronies start combing the taiga in search of living things to shoot for sport.

"Satan-i-cheney" Coutesy of democralypsenow.blogspot.com

Oh!  Damn…I guess other humanoids holding boston lager in hunter’s fatigues don’t count.  Hey! Dick makes mistakes doesn’t everyone? sic.  Back to the other denizens of the taiga who mind their own business, actually belong there and don’t drink boston lager whilst handling firearms, who would that be?….um…let’s see… the animals?

More and more the “Deco-hunter-trend” seems to have oozed slowly from the taiga of the greater Northern Americas and seeped into the hearts and minds of upscale “uber-designers” as they have never been so keen as to use this motif for or  in lighting fixtures, lamps and upscale restaurants.  I think that we would be better Americans if we changed the  “scene of Americana,”  or at the very least the icons of the “Great North America.”

PETA members, active and gift-bearing sympathizers are now “on to”  those that promote the subjugating practice of buying and displaying Trophy animals on the walls of their restaurants, bars and personal spaces. Animal activists (whom should quite simply be called life Activists, as they are supporting and protecting life, in particular the lives of animals), have been asking everyone to consider the rights that animals have to live.  These activists are asking us all to go a step further and think about “the promotion of the horror of  killing for sport”  in particular the use of “trophy animals.” If Trophy heads are being used in the “design” of a “space” or to support an “art idea” it is wrong. Yes, we are talking to you!  The fine artists dwelling saliently in dilapidated but decidedly cool downtown lofts, we urge you to really think about your “installations. Do they even vaguely support this subjugation?  Hopefully not.  Hopefully arm-chair activists we have not become.  Manifesting our activism on blogs and Face-book but rarely in real life.     Whether it’s a convoluted window dressing “just trying to give the feeling of Americana”, or “the close to the bone living off the land ” type of feel, it is wrong.   How about the restaurant designer who thinks that a trophy-head gives that just right je ne sais quois,  mix of testosterone and boutique lager” that draws in the 21-35’er “city cool” male demographic he’s aiming for?  This trend is bad for the animals, for environmentalism, it’s bad judgement in general, and further teaches our children to subjugate animals.  Let’s let Johnny who pours salt on slugs grow out of that ‘sometimes common boyhood mis-judgement’, and become a concerned and caring individual not only towards other humans, but also toward his unspeaking but feeling animal neighbors.

I’ve got a great idea!  Let’s substitute Trophy animals with “Trophy wives?”  How about that?  Imagine for a moment won’t you?   Woman “A” puts an ad in (of course, Craig’s List), for a “sugar-daddy” and voila!  One “dubiously lucky” guy gets his trophy wife and then has a bolt driven into her underside and has her put on a trophy mount!   No longer a nuissance  having her on his arm for the looks and no meaningful conversation, and the status 2-7, now he can pretty much just place her on a shelf to point out whenever guests come by to visit.

It’s the “hey look what I did!” syndrome.  “Aren’t I a man? Look how strong and able I am!”  It’s where primitivo meets insecurity.  It can be on Match.com or in a restaurant in Michigan.  We can’t control whose psyche needs the trophy, but we can control whether we patronize establishments that display that kind of cruelty. If we wouldn’t think of doing that to women in America, then why do we do that to our Moose and Elk friends?

If it's good enough for the Trophy Moose, it's good enough for the Trophy Wife

When you enter a restaurant or bar that promotes this practice.  Ask them this:

Concerned cool person (you) says: “Excuse me, may I ask you a question?”

Capricious and unaware or just plain cruel bar / restaurant owner:  “Sure! What’s up? seating okay?”

Concerned cool person (You) says:  “I was wondering whether you enjoy decapitation.”

Capricious and unaware or just plain cruel bar / restaurant owner:  “What the? Why would you ask me that?”

Concerned cool person (you) says: Well I don’t think that it’s necessary to mount lifeless decapitated animals on the walls to make your food any better.  We all “get” the “Americana” thing.  Can I replace the Moose head with a piece of art work representing that moose / elk head?

Capricious and unaware or just plain cruel bar / restaurant owner:  “Um… well can I see your artwork?”

At this point, you have a potential customer, you can tell them about how they ‘really don’t want PETA to come and review the restaurant’ and then show them your portfolio.

It’s suggested to have some ideas available or at least pull up your blog on your iphone and show them your work.

Here’s a cool installation I ran across, and sky’s the limit on what else can be ideated!

Go to 2 http://www.watermelonwatermelon.com to read about this artwork

please…I don’t want to look into those glassy sad eyes anymore, anywhere.

-Chrissylong

Globe Lust: “Coal-fired plants – what do they mean to us?”


Coal Mining in America, The way it's done...not good.

Globe Lust:

“Coal-fired plants – what do they mean to us?”

By Beverly Franco  –  Los Angeles Environmentalist / Activist

I often ask myself, if we are burning coal to provide electricity, where does the coal come from and at what cost? Not just the cost in dollars, but in social and natural capital.

Social capital is the human equation that we need to include and consider in every decision. Add natural capital – which is the impact of the decision and/or project on nature.  Both of these need and must be considered before focusing on the financial capital of any undertaking, no matter what it is or involves.

These two very important and vital capital investments should rule and guide all of our decisions, whether its here or in another country – around the world.   Each person’s humanity needs to be considered, as well as the natural world we all live in.  Can we afford the long-term costs in the human equation?

So, we are back to coal – that black stuff that I remember watching come down the coal shute into the basement which was part of our house in Madison, Wisconsin. My understanding of what it did was limited by this 8 year old’s simple and as yet, uneducated mind. I knew my aunt and uncle used it to heat this large two-story house we lived in. I don’t recall being cold, so guess it did the job. I wasn’t into questioning then. Now, I’m trying make up for lost time.

Now my understanding and my questioning has broadened and I want to know where the coal comes from for the carbon-producing coal-fired plants and what is the damage to acquire that coal?  The damage to the miners who have gone down into the mines for many years – it’s a living, but the end result for those miners was and is black-lung disease, which means a reduced quality of life and early death.

Now we have MTRMountain-top removal, where the coal companies, with deep pockets, blast off the tops of mountains. When you blow up something, what happens? There is debris, fallout that has to go somewhere.  Imagine turning on your kitchen faucet and seeing black water coming out, or attempting to take a shower and the same thing happening. You are now dirtier than you were when you  stepped into the shower!   Waterways, rivers, streams and the water are things we need to survive.  Yuk!  Now picture a “pond” filled with sludge – a by-product of separating coal from rock. This is what the residents of West Virginia. Kentucky, and Tennessee live with.

I’m well aware that there are always hazards around us, but some could be prevented.  Like the coal industry, in its wake, does shovel its waste into open pits, leaves abandoned mines, and huge slurry ponds like the one that burst its banks, December 2008 in Kingston, Tennessee, sending a billion gallons of toxic goo into and across the Emory River, covering 300 acres six feet deep. And there are more sites that threaten the land, water, and lives of the citizens in these areas.

In West Virginia, where this latest MTR is underway by Massey Coal. The last mountain standing is Coal River Mountain in the Coal River Valley. Residents are fighting to stop this and have formed Coal River Mountain Project to explore wind energy instead of blasting the mountain to kingdom come or to hell, whichever way you want to call it.  Massey has already received the necessary permits to blast away.

The residents of this valley are also very, very concerned, not only about their water supply, which is still fresh and drinkable, for now. But less than 100 yards from the site where earth-shattering explosives are being detonated by Massey Coal, lies the Brushy Fork Impoundment – the largest lake of coal sludge in the Western Hemisphere. The instability of such impoundments is a disaster waiting to happen.

Its important to point out that, more than likely, the coal will be gone in 20 years, but what will be left if its all been blown up and the waste hasn’t gone anywhere?  The lack of vision for a viable future is subverted by money, and its called greed.

Personally, I find it harder and harder to sleep in my cozy, electrified and comfortable home, while others are not so comfortable or safe.  Its called Bearing Witness, a Quaker axiom – once you know, you can still chose to turn away but not from ignorance.  We know now and we can chose to act, to make change, to demand change. Its in our power and it’s the right thing to do.

In Arizona, Hopi and Navajo Native Americans are trudging toward a future that might include electricity. Electricity that is generated by solar and wind.   Electricity that, until recently, didn’t exist on the reservation where they lived, even though many worked for Peabody Coal-fired plant! For 30+ years Peabody has used the Black Rock aquifer to transport the coal, called slurry to a station that supplied the electricity for southern Arizona, Nevada and California.  Did you note that the  Native Americans did not have electricity, all the while 50% of the residents were working at this coal-fired plant? Now that aquifer is history and the company, Peabody, has closed down the plant instead of going to the expense of installing scrubbers to capture the polluting carbon being emitted by the plant. Imagine, if you will, what 30+ years of emitting that has done to our atmosphere, to our lungs?

Ignorance on the part of many, myself included, helps to continue this voracious and insidious habit of supporting our comfort zones, while at the terminus of the process, many go without.  Children doing their homework by daylight, quickly, or using kerosene lamps or candlelight.   Where is the outrage?

My children didn’t suffer that. Just flip a switch, turn on the faucet.

Get your pencils out to write down the name of the organization that the Hopi and Navajo have formed to bring in their own electricity, their own employment by way of wind and solar farms utilizing the monies from cap-and-trade? Sandia Tribal Energy Program.

Hopis and Navajos will generate their OWN power!

Edison has fought this, as they believe the rate-payers should get this money. If the savings from cap-and-trade can be passed on to our first citizens to be self-sustaining and self-supporting, it’s the right thing to do. And, maybe, its about time that was the agenda, for us all.

Lights, fresh water, jobs. Add in dignity and respect, and we all have hope.– Beverly Franco, Writer and Green Activist